Archive for category Travel

2014 International Travel Update

One of my goals is to join the Traveler’s Century Club, a “social organization representing world travelers that have visited 100 or more of the world’s countries and territories”.  The full list of countries and territories can be found here. I provided an update in 2013; below is the list of countries/territories I’ve visited to date through the end of 2014:  With my trip to New Zealand and the Chatham Islands at the end of 2014, the total now stands at 80 countries/territories visited.

PACIFIC OCEAN (5 of 39)

  • Australia
  • Chatham Islands
  • Hawaiian Islands
  • New Zealand
  • Tasmania

NORTH AMERICA (4 of 6)

  • Alaska
  • Canada
  • Mexico
  • United States (continental)

CENTRAL AMERICA (5 of 7)

  • Belize (British Honduras)
  • Costa Rica
  • El Salvador
  • Guatemala
  • Honduras

SOUTH AMERICA (4 of 14)

  • Argentina
  • Brazil
  • Chile
  • Peru

CARIBBEAN (18 of 30)

  • Anguilla
  • Antigua & Deps. (Barbuda, Redonda)
  • Aruba
  • Bahamas
  • Barbados
  • Cayman Islands
  • Cuba
  • Curacao
  • Dominican Republic
  • Jamaica
  • Leeward Islands, French (St. Martin)
  • Puerto Rico
  • St. Kitts & Nevis
  • St. Lucia
  • St. Maarten (formerly Netherlands Antilles)
  • Turks & Caicos Islands
  • Virgin Islands, U.S. (St. Croix, St. John, St. Thomas)
  • Virgin Islands, British (Tortola, etc.)

ATLANTIC OCEAN (0 of 13)

EUROPE & MEDITERRANEAN (25 of 67)

  • Austria
  • Belgium
  • Bulgaria
  • Corsica
  • Czech Republic
  • Denmark
  • England
  • Estonia
  • France
  • Germany
  • Greece
  • Hungary
  • Ireland (Eire)
  • Italy
  • Liechtenstein
  • Luxembourg
  • Netherlands
  • Portugal
  • Russia
  • Scotland
  • Spain
  • Switzerland
  • Turkey in Europe (Istanbul)
  • Ukraine
  • Vatican City

ANTARCTICA (0 of 7)

AFRICA (3 of 55)

  • Egypt in Africa
  • Morocco
  • South Africa

MIDDLE EAST (4 of 21)

  • Dubai
  • Egypt in Asia (Sinai Peninsula)
  • Oman
  • Qatar

INDIAN OCEAN (0 of 14)

ASIA (12 of 51)

  • China, People’s Republic
  • Hong Kong
  • Indonesia (Java)
  • Japan
  • Korea, South
  • Lesser Sunda Islands (Bali,Timor, Indonesia)
  • Macau
  • Philippines
  • Singapore
  • Thailand
  • Turkey in Asia (Anatolia, Ankara, Izmir)
  • Vietnam

“This list is recognized by the world as the standard of countries and territories that are politically, ethnologically or geographically different.”

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Tasmania 2014

So I finally made it down to Australia and planned a side trip to Tasmania to reconcile the Looney Tunes version of the Tasmanian Devil with the real thing.  Unable to get into the tour I wanted due to flight times, I rented a car and used their itinerary as a guideline.  We left Sydney early Tuesday morning, February 18th, landing in Launceston, Tasmania at 8:30am.  Our departing flight would leave from the capital city, Hobart on Saturday morning, February 22nd.  Between those two points we saw great sites, forests, beaches, and, of course, Tassie devils.

Our Tasmanian adventure started by picking up our Avis car rental at Launceston Airport.  We drove to Launceston and visited the Cataract Gorge, walking along the King’s Bridge-Cataract Walk into town. 

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We at lunch at the Old Mill in Launceston and returned to the Gorge via chairlift (longest single-span chairlift in the world).  Then we were off again.

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We left Launceston and traveled on A3 East to Binalong Bay on the Bay of Fires Conservation Area.  We swam in the soft, white sands of Grant’s Lagoon.

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We stopped for lunch at Binalong Bay Café and enjoyed the view of the beach and orange stones.

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After lunch, we continued down A3 to the Bicheno Blowhole.

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We ended the day at Coles Bay at Freycinet National Park and spent the night at Freycinet Lodge.

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Massive thunderstorms the next day gave us a late start in the day, but we were still able to hike to the Wineglass Bay Lookout, stopping first at the Coles Bay Lookout point:

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Before reaching the famous and popular Wineglass Bay Lookout Point:

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Hiking back from the lookout, we made friends with a wild wallaby.

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We headed off continuing south on A3 to Orford, where I took a “shortcut” across a dirt road through the forest to Copping, then continued down to Port Arthur on the Tasman Peninsula.  We ate dinner at ‘Felons’ in the Port Arthur Historical Site.  We checked into the Sea Change Safety Cove B&B, which has phenomenal views of the cliffs on the Tasman peninsula and is the only house on Safety Cove beach.  We’d spend two nights here.

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We left early after breakfast to the Tasmania Devil Conservation Park where we got to see Tasmanian Devils being fed wallabies.

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Then we got to feed and hang out with kangaroos and other native Australian/Tasmanian creatures.

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We returned from the Conservation Park and continued to the aptly named Remarkable Cave.

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(Unfortunately, no more pics after this point as I left my camera on the plane back to JFK and it has not been returned).

We spent time on the private beach at our B&B, then off to the town of Nubeena for dinner.  This was our last night at Sea Change Safety Cove B&B.  The next day we continued on towards our final stop in Hobart.  We stopped along the way to enjoy the views from various cliffs and coves.  We finally arrived at Hobart and checked in to the old Wooling Apartment Hotel.  We walked along Hobart Harbor to Salamanca.

Our flight back to Sydney left early Saturday morning, so this concluded our Tasmanian adventure.

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2013 International Travel Update

International Travel ImageOne of my goals is to join the Traveler’s Century Club, a “social organization representing world travelers that have visited 100 or more of the world’s countries and territories”.  Having recently celebrated a milestone birthday, I decided to take stock of my current status by cross-referencing my travel against the standard TCC Countries and Territories list.  Below is the full list showing the status of my foreign travels.  After eliminating some duplicates in the list, I am almost 70% of the way to joining the club.  My goal is to be in the club before I hit my own half-century mark.

ABKHAZIA – AZORES

    • Alaska
    • Anguilla
    • Antigua & Deps. (Barbuda, Redonda)
    • Argentina
    • Aruba
    • Austria

BAHAMAS – BURUNDI

    • Bahamas
    • Bali (see Lesser Sunda Islands)
    • Barbados
    • Belgium
    • Belize (British Honduras)
    • Brazil
    • British Honduras (see Belize)
    • Bulgaria

CABINDA – CZECH REPUBLIC

    • Caicos (see Turks & Caicos)
    • Canada
    • Cayman Islands
    • Chile
    • China, People’s Republic of
    • Corsica
    • Costa Rica
    • Curacao
    • Czech Republic

DAHOMEY – DZAOUDZI

    • Denmark
    • Dominican Republic
    • Dubai

EASTER ISLAND – ETHIOPIA

    • Egypt
    • El Salvador
    • England

FAKAOFU – FUTUNA

    • France

GABON – GUYANA

    • Germany
    • Greece
    • Guatemala

HAINAN – HUNGARY

    • Hawaiian Islands
    • Honduras
    • Hong Kong

ICELAND – IZMIR

    • Indonesia
    • Ireland, Republic of (Eire)
    • Istanbul (see Turkey in Europe)
    • Italy

JAMAICA – JUAN FERNANDEZ

    • Jamaica
    • Japan

KALAALLIT – KYRGYZSTAN

    • Korea, South (Republic of Korea)

LAKSHADWEEP – LUXEMBOURG

    • Leeward Islands, French (St. Martin)
    • Lesser Sunda Islands (Bali,Timor, Indonesia)
    • Liechtenstein
    • Luxembourg

MACAU – MYANMAR

    • Mexico

NAKHICHEVAN – OMAN

    • Netherlands
    • Netherlands Antilles (see St. Maarten)

PAGO PAGO – QUEEN MAUD LAND

    • Peru
    • Philippines
    • Portugal
    • Puerto Rico

RARATONGA – RYUKYU ISLANDS

    • Russia

SABA – SYRIA

    • Scotland
    • Singapore
    • South Africa
    • Spain
    • St. Kitts & Nevis
    • St. Maarten (formerly Netherlands Antilles)
    • St. Martin (see Leeward Islands, French)
    • St. Thomas (see Virgin Islands, U.S.)
    • Switzerland

TAHITI – TUVALU

    • Thailand
    • Tortola (see Virgin Islands, British)
    • Turkey in Asia (Anatolia, Ankara, Izmir)
    • Turkey in Europe (Istanbul)
    • Turks & Caicos Islands

UGANDA – UZBEKISTAN

    • Ukraine
    • United States (continental)

VAITAPU – VOLCANO ISLAND

    • Vatican City
    • Vietnam
    • Virgin Islands, British (Tortola, etc.)
    • Virgin Islands, U.S. (St. Croix, St. John, St. Thomas)

WAKE ISLAND – ZIMBABWE

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Paragliding The Crimea, Ukraine 2012

IMG_9091On my way out to a business trip in the Ukraine, I quickly looked up the weather conditions on Bing and did a quick search for ‘Ukraine Paragliding”.  A 10-second analysis told me I should bring my paraglider on the off chance that I’d have some spare time after work and was able to find a good spot to fly.  I am certainly glad I took the chance.  I had a great flight off the coast of the Black Sea near the town of Yalta in The Crimea, Ukraine.

A bit more back story – I flew out to the Ukraine to meet with an equipment manufacturer.  My key contact, Sergii, offered to make my hotel reservations since I have never been to the area.  I left it in his capable hands and was quite happy with their decision.  We stayed at the Oreanda Hotel in Yalta, a cool coastal town with a great boardwalk, rocky Black Sea beach, and a vibrant energy.  The hotel is listed as “One of the Special Hotels in the World”.  Anyway, after work they offered to take me to a local, world-famous winery, Massandra (more on that in another post).  Sergii did some research for me and found a flyable mountain about an hour away from the hotel.  The mountain is generally flyable only early in the morning or after 6pm, so we ate a meal after the winery and headed up the long, winding road in Igor’s BMW SUV to get to the top of Ay-Petrinskaya Yayla mountain.

IMG_9097 We arrived at the top of the mountain right at 6pm.  The views from this location were breathtaking.  We were clearly able to see both the towns of Yalta to the East (the picture here on the left) and Haspra and Koreiz to the south.  The Black Sea was an incredible deep blue, but unfortunately my photos don’t accurately portray that very well.  The surrounding mountains were a combination of imposing cliff-faces and lush, green trees, which are clearly visible from any point in town.

 

By the time I was preparing to take off, the SE winds died down significantly.  A few local hang-gliding pilots were hanging out after having done some flying earlier in the day.  Being locals, they gave me some pointers on the local flying conditions and the landing zone, which was a dried out vineyard off the main road and on the way to the coast.  Due to the light winds, take-off required some significant speed, with an overzealous pilot giving me an extra push for good luck.  Here’s a video of the take-off:

IMG_9332Once airborne, it was smooth sailing straight to the Black Sea.  I circled over the town of Kurpaty for a bit, tempted to make a dash for the Sea and put down on the coast.  I decided to err on the side of caution and headed back to the designated landing zone which was north of the main road.  The road and landing zone are visible in the picture to the left.  I decided to land as close to the road as possible near the center to minimize my travel over the dried vine-field to the exit.

IMG_9322 Total airtime was close to 30 minutes.  I packed up my gear in my stuff sack and started hiking east on the main road to minimize Igor’s trip from the top of the mountain to the main road to pick me up.  I walked about 2 kilometers before they made it down.  Overall, a great flying experience, my only regret is that I didn’t have more time in the Ukraine for additional flights.  If I ever go back, I plan to have my paraglider handy again.

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SXSW 2012: A First-Timer’s Perspective

PepsiCo Central Lounge at SXSW Austin, TX: This year I made the pilgrimage to the annual expo known as South by South West (SXSW).  As one of the Executive leads of Equipment Innovation at PepsiCo, I was there to showcase examples of innovation in marketing equipment, specifically our Smart Digital Cooler and Social Vending Machine concepts.  PepsiCo is a platinum sponsor of SXSW, so we had a large corner of the Austin Convention center dedicated as Pepsi Central, with our digital marketing equipment, the Zeitgeist, and Pepsi Central Digital Message Board.

In addition to working, I was able to enjoy panels, sessions, and parties at SXSW.  It was definitely an interesting and memorable experience, and here are a few of my observations about the event.

Registration/Badges:

Fortunately, I arrived on Thursday and checked in early for my badge.  My total wait time was less than 10 minutes as I waited in the ‘Platinum Sponsors’ lounge for my badge to be printed.  Folks on Friday were not as fortunate.  The line wrapped around the entire convention center, twice.  There was roughly a 2+ hour wait for attendees to get their badges.  For a conference that has a huge interactive component to it, I would have expected a much more efficient registration process.  They might want to take a page out of the book of CES and consider mailing out badges ahead of the conference.  For badges that cost $400 – $1,000, that would be a comparatively small incremental cost for a significantly improved user registration experience.

Panels and Keynotes:

The sheer number of panels was a bit overwhelming.  The first time I went to the SXSW website to investigate the panels which I was interested in attending, I selected a dozen from the list, before I realized they all occurred simultaneously.  You have to plan well ahead of time to see the panels that are of most interest to you, especially since the panels are spread across Austin.  Fortunately, the SXSW organizers had great apps for both iPad and Windows Phone 7, which helped tremendously in discovering and scheduling panels of interest.  I had an interesting conversation with someone I reconnected with at SXSW.  She mentioned the she and her husband no longer go to panels because they get well-recognized folks who don’t prepare, and since the moderators are talking to well-known figures, they don’t prepare either.  That was an interesting perspective that I actually experienced on one of the panels, but I wouldn’t say it was the norm. 

WP_001427 I plan to write about some of the panels and keynotes I attended on a separate blog post.  In the meantime, I’ll just say that I was impressed with the list of individuals that were tapped to speak at SXSW.  The sessions I was treated to included appearances by Biz Stone (founder of Twitter), Bing Gordon (EA legend), Al Gore, Sean Parker (of Napster and Facebook fame), Andy Cohen (Bravo), and others.

Parties:

WP_001530 There was certainly no lack of evening events at SXSW with many sponsoring and non-sponsoring organizations hosting some impressive soirees.  I attended two hosted by PepsiCo (one with Turntable.fm and the other with Star Wars and Brisk).  I also attended the Tweethouse Tweetup and a few others.  I’ll say that most were really not my scene (large mosh-pits of music where it’s really impossible to talk to anyone).  The Tweetup had a good music act but also the opportunity to converse with attendees and was held in an interesting spot (Lance Armstrong’s Bike Shop).  Easily my favorite was the Brisk Bodega sponsored by PepsiCo and Lucas and featuring Star Wars artwork and Brisk Star Wars TV Spots.  They had a great DJ playing the bottom floor, but also an open-air upper level allowing you to connect with attendees.

Films:

WP_001473 Unfortunately, my only experience with SXSW film screenings was just how hard it was to get into them.  I only tried to get into two, and the lines literally wrapped around the block.  It’s a shame because there seemed to be a really good selection of films there, but I no longer have the time or patience to form a queue two hours in advance of a film.  I ended up just taking pictures of the film posters to remind myself of the ones I wanted to see eventually.  One of those films was ‘The Hunter’ with William Dafoe.  Scheduling didn’t work out, but when I got home this weekend, I noticed on my Xbox 360 Zune Video Marketplace that I could actually watch the film before it hits theaters.  Sometimes it’s just worth paying for stuff.

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Emerald City Comicon 2011 Highlights

The first Comic Book Convention I attended was the 2010 San Diego Comicon.  I was there to help announce the Xbox 360 Halo Reach Special Edition console, which I drove as the Global Product Manager at Microsoft.  It was an interesting experience to say the least, and I did get to attend a Smallville panel (my favorite show), for their last season.  So when my wife (of all people) told me that Seattle has its own Comic Convention called Emerald City Comicon, I decided it would be an interesting way to spend the weekend.

IMG_1025 I arrived well before the 10am start time to purchase my tickets, spending just under two hours in line.  My first picture opportunity came in that line with a group of Star Wars Stormtroopers and a decent Obi-wan Kenobi cosplayer.  After getting in and walking the main floor, I quickly realized that this was quite the different convention than San Diego Comicon.  First off, it was actually truly a Comic Book Convention.  The majority of the booths on the main floor were for comic book stores, whereas the San Diego Comicon has been taken over by lots of different media, including TV, movies, and videogames.  After trolling the floor for a bit and marveling at the $400 classic Transformers figures (and being bummed out that I don’t have my childhood Transformers anymore), I decided to spend most of the day attending the panel sessions.

The first panel was the “Skewed and Reviewed” Movie panel by Gareth von Kallenbach.  Essentially it was an hour of Mr. Gareth dishing out confirmed (?) rumors about upcoming movies.  Some of the newsbites that Mr. Kallenbach announced that most caught my attention:

  • According to 20th Century Fox, X-Files 3 is in the writing stage.  The main plot revolves around the pivotal date December 12, which Mr. Kallenbach says was a major part of the fiction of the TV series.  The movie is tentatively titled “X-Files: End Game”.
  • Elizabeth Hurley is slated to play a villian on the new Wonder Woman television series.
  • Paramount Studios authorized $175M for the Star Trek movie sequel to J.J. Abrams without ever reading a script.
  • Robert Downey Jr. and John Favreau don’t like each other.  Because of this dislike, Mr. Favreau will not be involved in Iron Man 3.  Additionally, when Downey Jr. found out Mr. Favreau was involved in Cowboys vs. Aliens, he turned down the part which later went to Daniel Craig.

IMG_1039 At the end of this panel I received a pass for two to see a pre-screening of Battlefield: LA.  After getting this pass, I went to the main room in 4A for 5 straight panels.  First up was a panel on The Guild with Felicia Day, Wesley Wheaton, and Amy Okuda.  The banter between the three was some of the most enjoyable of all the panels that day.  Asked if it was difficult to audition in Hollywood being Asian, Ms. Okuda mentioned that she finds it easier since there are not that many Asian actresses to compete with as opposed to the glut of blonde Caucasian women.  Mr. Wheaton, who I’ll admit I loathed as the character Wesley Crusher on Star Trek: The Next Generation, did a great job on the panel and had me switching my tune by the end.

IMG_1040 I stayed on afterwards to watch the Fringe panel.  I must admit, I had never heard of this particular Fox show, but since I was able to get a front row seat, I didn’t want to give it up as I was looking forward to the Frakes/Spiner panel.  As I tweeted about the Fringe panel, I started to get some fans sending me information about the show, peaking my interest.  Since I was a big fan of the X-Files growing up, this seems like a show I’d enjoy.  The panelists were show stars John Noble (Walter Bishop) and Jasika Nicole (Astrid Farnsworth). 

IMG_1045 The Jonathan Frakes (William Riker) and Brent Spiner (Data) panel was definitely a treat, kicked off by Mr. Spiner impersonating Patrick Stewart.  It was moderated by a local radio host BJ, who apparently did an excellent job moderating the panel on Friday and was therefore invited by Frakes to moderate this panel.  Unfortunately, he didn’t do a stellar job at this panel.  At one point he started talking about Mr. Spiner’s recent colonoscopy posts on twitter, and started sharing his own rectal exam stories, prompting the audience to shout to him to move on and take audience questions.  To his credit, he immediately opened the floor to questions.  One unexpected tales from Mr. Spiner was his admission that he remembered a certain episode of Star Trek: The Next Generation because it was on his birthday and he was suffering from a shingles outbreak.  As Mr. Spock would say, “Fascinating”.

The next panel was for Buffy the Vampire Slayer, including show stars James Marsters (Spike), Nicholas Brendon (Xander), and Clare Kramer (Glory).  My older brother was a huge fan of this show.  I’ll admit I know about it and have seen the random episode here or there, but never truly followed it.  I tried to remedy that by starting the series from Season 1 on Netflix, but didn’t get very far.  In any case, James Marsters played Braniac on my ultimate favorite TV show Smallville, so it was still worth sticking around. 

IMG_1052 The final panel I attended was “Spotlight on William Shatner”.  This was a self-moderated solo appearance by Mr. Shatner.  He started off taking questions immediately from the audience, and took an average of 5-7 minutes answering each question.  At one point he became so engrossed in his own story that he completely forgot the question he was answering.  Nevertheless, he made a strong connection with the crowd and kept us entertained with his stories.  My favorite story came when he was talking about his disappointment with the Star Trek Generations movie and the need to kill of the Captain Kirk character.  They originally filmed him being shot in the back.  Thinking that Captain Kirk deserved a more heroic ending, they re-filmed this to have him die by a bridge scaffolding falling on him.  Here he discussed coming up with his favorite line ever… With all the years of hearing “Captain on the Bridge”, he wanted to say “Bridge on the Captain”.  For obvious reasons, it wasn’t approved and the line was cut.

The rest of the show I spent walking the main floor and capturing some of the great costumes worn by the dedicated attendees.  I leave off with some highlights from what I was able to capture.

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1994 SAE Mini Baja East in Quebec, Canada

First I get a tweet from a current member of the Cooper Union Motorsports team the same day I find my old presentation slides from my senior project in 1994.  A week later I find the negatives for the pictures taken during the 1994 SAE Mini Baja East competition AND an old school newsletter with details about the competition.  Uncanny.  Seems like the story wants to be told 🙂

In my previous posting on the Mini Baja competition, I described the design and construction of the “dune buggy” for my Mechanical Engineering senior design project.  Now that I found the pictures of the actual competition, I’ll talk separately about the actual competition weekend.

PIC_0044 It came down to the wire, but on May 26, 1994, I rented a Ryder truck and packed up the official Cooper Union Mini Baja vehicle in the back, along with the few tools and equipment we had. George was going to join us in Canada, but his mother didn’t want him driving the whole way up there, so she bought him a plane ticket. She was also nice enough to by my younger brother, Jiovanie, a ticket as well, since this now meant that I had to drive the whole way on my own. My college girlfriend joined in the trip, so Abdel volunteered to be buckled into the Baja vehicle for the long journey up to Montreal. At Canadian customs, the officer asked me if I had anything to declare. I told him that I had a friend strapped down in the back of the truck. He just waved me through, and that was officially my first time out of the country (of course, Puerto Rico doesn’t count since it’s a US Commonwealth).

PIC_0053 We realized that we were small fish immediately upon arriving at the event in Quebec. While it was just the four of us there (me, Jiovanie, Abdel, and George), many of the other teams were twenty students strong (or greater), had custom trailers, and a list of sponsors that would make NASCAR drivers envious. I heard talk of $20,000 budgets, an order of magnitude greater than what I had to work with. I still remember the first time we pulled the Mini-Baja out of the trailer. Across from us was a team from Stonybrook (if I recall correctly). They had a ramp for their car and 4-6 people to push the vehicle out of the trailer. My friend Abby and I watched them unload. When they were done, we each grabbed an end and lifted our car out of the U-Haul truck and plopped it onto the ground. The team across the way were completely amazed at how light our vehicle was. I guess it was a good thing that the budget was so scarce – it helped to build a bare-bones vehicle. I ended up working with one of those guys from Stonybrook at Honda R&D in Ohio just a year later.

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PIC_0056Before any racing could take place, we had to go through a whole series of design and safety inspections.  We pretty much nailed the safety inspections with the exception of the rear propeller guard.  I had a just put a temporary makeshift chicken-wire cage around the propeller, but it didn’t meet safety requirements.  Jiovanie set about modifying and building a custom cage for the propeller that was more structurally sound and helped us pass the inspection.  The safety/design judge was nice enough to give us some pointers, given that this was our first time in an SAE competition.  His first comment was that the front wheels were too small (something I was completely aware of, but decided to go with the left over wheels from the previous attempt to save money).PIC_0058

We had a tough time with our engine throughout the first day.  We were only able to enter two of the driving events.  We had to call over one of the Briggs and Stratton representatives to check out our engine for us.  This was the engine that was delivered the previous year and was not opened or used until this event.  After inspecting the engine, the Briggs and Stratton representatives told us we had a defective engine and they would get us a replacement.  Unfortunately, the vehicle wasn’t really designed for a quick engine replacement, so we had to withdraw from the rest of the events, including the all day endurance race the next day.  It was pretty ironic that the one part of the vehicle that we didn’t design or build and that we weren’t allowed to modify was the thing that kept us from competing fully in the event.  In the end, we ended up placing 39th out of 55 registered teams.  This was thanks to the two events in which we were able to compete and my design report.

1994 SAE Mini Baja Side Trip While we didn’t place anywhere near the top, at least we weren’t in last place, and we were the smallest team that I saw at the event. We did have a load of fun at the event, and after it was all over, we all went horseback riding to blow off steam. The following year, as a graduate student at Cooper, we had two teams enter the competition, and I served as an advisor. This event was directly responsible for my first career after getting my Mechanical Engineering degree from Cooper Union – an Automotive Body Design Engineer for Honda R&D near Columbus, Ohio. I also later went on to serve as the Chair of the 1997 SAE Midwest Mini Baja Competition held in Ohio.

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